Thankful for the Memories

We're all blessed with things we don't deserve. Good health, a loving family, education, friends, and meaningful employment are not always guaranteed for all. However, each of us can look back, make a truthful assessment, and be grateful for something this Thanksgiving holiday.



Thanksgiving history.



For more than 400 years, Americans have celebrated a time of giving thanks. No matter the amount of blessing, Thanksgiving happens even during times of upheaval. President Abraham Lincoln declared it a national day to fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty hand to heal the wounds of the nation. Now, with Thanksgiving dinner immediately disrupted by Black Friday, how is it that Americans are hungry for even more?



Americans starving for something on Black Friday.



What is our hunger?



I believe America is starved for meaningful connection, not more stuff. With its incessant ads, broadcast social media has actually worsened our condition. Like the temporary dopamine triggered in our brains when someone likes our posting, so too is the short term pleasure derived from buying many material possessions. We're addicted to wanting more, with little gratitude for what's already important in our lives.



Humans always hunger for meaningful connection.



How to find gratitude.



Looking back makes us feel grateful. Sometimes memories help us recall humble beginnings, making us thankful for where we are now. Other times we look back and are grateful to celebrate past events that would be unachievable today. All memories engage feelings on a spectrum from melancholy to euphoric, each filling us with a spirit of thanksgiving.



Thankful to share memories with those we love.



Thankful memories.



Love letters.
Wedding videos.
Newborn photos of your babies.
Pictures from parties.
Yearbooks and class photos.
Slides from vacation travel.
Recordings of music recitals.
Drawings and notes from your kids.
Video of family gatherings.
Voicemails that changed your life.
Home movie reels.
Ancestral photographs.



Memories of shared experiences are powerful.



The science of memories.



I believe memories are incredibly powerful, even healing. Watching home movies and paging through photo albums makes your brain release oxytocin, the love hormone. It's similar to the joy many experience when watching a cat video. However, memories of shared events strengthen your connections to others, and dramatically increase your gratitude. I believe our shared memories are priceless compared to so many other material items.



Heirloom helps you have gratitude for all your memories.



Are your memories secure?



Humans capture billions of photos from our mobile devices every day. Many of these are lost in a sea of digital clutter. Worse, boxes of printed photos & video on reels, cassettes, and discs are at risk for total loss. I founded Heirloom to connect us with our memories and each other, so we'll never lack gratitude for past experiences. Heirloom provides a secure network to delightfully exchange memories with those you love, for life.



Written by Geoff Weber

Leave a comment

More stories

Unearthing the Iconic JVC HR-VP48U VHS Tape Player: The Ultimate Throwback Experience

The JVC HR-VP48U VCR is a classic VHS player first introduced in the 1990s. They're still used, but convert the VHS tapes to digital before they go bad.

Unlocking Memories: A Guide to Salvaging Home Movies from Scratched DVDs

Rescue home movies from failing YesVideo DVDs. Get tips on buffing the discs & transferring the content to the cloud. Finally, your treasures will be safe!